Brazil’s government approves additional funding for National Broadband Plan

Supported by a population of some 204 million, the Brazilian telecoms market is among the largest in Latin America. Telecoms revenue has been adversely affected by the ongoing economic crisis which has dented consumer confidence and reduced spend on services.

The country’s telecom infrastructure will be significantly augmented during the next two years as additional submarine cables become ready for service. In addition, the government-owned SGDC satellite, due to be launched in March 2017, will provide defence communications for the Ministry of Defence as well as broadband services to support the National Broadband Plan (PNBL), a project which recently secured additional funding.

Substantial investments and regulatory reforms were implemented before the FIFA World Cup was held in 2014 and again before the 2016 Olympic Games. The Games stimulated investment in infrastructure, though the chief beneficiaries were the host cities rather than the country at large.

The fixed-line market has been hit by consumers substituting services for mobile and VoIP solutions. The broadband market is also one of the largest markets in the region, though broadband penetration is only slightly above the Latin American average, trailing behind neighbouring Chile, Argentina, and Uruguay. The mobile market is dominated by the four network operators Vivo, Claro, TIM and Oi. All four secured spectrum in the 2.5GHz band with which they are expanding their LTE networks and so capitalising on consumer demand for mobile data services. The government has also sanctioned the use of the 700MHz band – previously allocated to TV broadcasters – for mobile broadband use, though the spectrum will not be fully released by broadcasters until further into 2017.

The mobile subscriber base grew rapidly for a number of years, in line with the increasing footprint of mobile networks, but since late 2015 the number of subscribers has fallen sharply. This was partly due to operators cancelling dormant SIM cards, as also to pricing competition which eroded the need among some consumers to hold SIM cards from different providers and so take advantage of cheaper on-net offers. Another factor has been the economic recession.

A new BuddeComm report provides detail on Brazil’s telecom market, including an assessment of infrastructure developments and the regulatory environment. It profiles the main fixed-line operators and examines their strategies in the light of relevant company financial and operating statistics. The report also reviews the digital media and broadband markets, accompanied by analyses and broadband scenario forecasts to 2021. In addition the report examines the mobile voice and data market, including a range of statistics and analyses, as also scenario forecasts.

For detailed information, table of contents and pricing see: Brazil – Telecoms, Mobile, Broadband and Digital Media – Statistics and Analyses

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