Archive for December, 2009

New Zealand’s Ultra-Fast Broadband Network

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

Broadband uptake in New Zealand continued by 14% in 2009 which was above the OECD average, a trend that is likely to continue through to 2010/11, by which time fibre-based services will be more widely available. Information on the key broadband providers as well as broadband statistics and forecasts to 2010 is detailed in the publication.

While DSL continues to be New Zealand’s most common broadband connection type (77%), there is a notable trend toward mobile broadband connections. Over the 15-month period from March 2008 to June 2009, the number of subscribers with cellular, cable or satellite connections climbed by 53% to reach 220,000.

Broadband subscribers – annual change by technology – 2005 – 2010

Year

DSL

Other1

Mobile

Fibre

Total

Annual change

2005 169% 64%

n/a

159%
2006 60% 56%

n/a

60%
2007 34% 14%

n/a

33%
2008 24% 38% 16% 0% 26%
2009 15% 36% 1% 100% 18%
2010 (e) 12% 10% 1% 10% 26%

(Source: BuddeComm based on company data)

Notes: 1 Datacards, cable, and satellite subscribers.

The next step in broadband is however revolutionary. The New Zealand Government has given further details on the policies it announced earlier in 2009 regarding its $1.5 billion investment in a national ultra-fast broadband network. The plan has received widespread support. Based on a wholesale-only open network the new infrastructure will set the country up for the new direction that is being taken in telecommunications – from a telephone, and in recent times an Internet network, to essential infrastructure for a range of other economic and social sectors including the development of e-government, e-commerce and digital media.

The government has also committed to partnering with the private sector to accelerate the rollout of close to $3.5 billion for an ultra-fast broadband service to 75% of New Zealanders within the next ten years. The government’s commitment to New Zealand will create a booming ICT industry based on the services being able to be developed and delivered using the Ultra-Fast Broadband Network.

In this new BuddeComm publication we draw attention to the importance of looking across sectors to create synergy. The New Zealand Government is expected to further enhance its trans-sector policies for the UFB during 2010. We discuss a new approach, which applies across infrastructure projects, and look at the potential synergies between the building of roads, sewerage systems, water and gas pipe networks, as well as telecoms and electricity networks.

The UFB will stimulate the digital economy and digital media companies are playing an increasingly important role in the telecommunications markets. An overview on the digital economy and digital media markets in 2009, including updates and information on the e-health and e-learning markets. A snapshot of the current status of the smart grid market, smart homes and smart meter debate is provided with information on renewable energy products and where the market may trend in 2010. Information on the latest offerings in the mobile TV market is highlighted.

BuddeComm’s annual publication, New Zealand – Ultra-Fast Broadband provides a detailed overview and analysis of the emerging Ultra-Fast Broadband Network. Statistics and further analysis on the Internet, broadband, Digital Economy, Digital Media and wireless broadband sectors of the New Zealand telecommunications markets are also detailed. For more information see: New Zealand – Ultra-Fast Broadband

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Internet TV Standard

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

The BBC’s governing body, the BBC Trust, has given a provisional go-ahead for a project which could launch demand for internet TV. Project Canvas is a partnership between the BBC, ITV, BT, Five, Channel 4 and TalkTalk to develop a so-called Internet Protocol Television standard.

It would see a range of set-top boxes available to access on-demand TV services such as iPlayer and ITVplayer.  Set-top boxes, expected to cost around £200, could be available in 2010.

The Trust reached its provisional conclusions following more than 800 written responses. It is proposing some conditions on the BBC’s participation in the venture and will have a further period of consultation, lasting until February.

The Trust ruled that Canvas would have a series of positive impacts, including furthering the growth of on-demand TV and increasing the opportunities for internet service providers to develop so called triple play – phone/TV/broadband – services.

However, the Trust found that it may slow the growth of pay TV and contribute to the shrinking of DVD rental market.

The Trust has imposed the following conditions on the BBC:

∑         The core technical specification must be published well in advance to allow manufacturers to adapt to the Canvas standard.

∑         Other content providers must have access to the platform.

∑         Any quality standards for internet service providers must be applied on a fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory basis.

∑         A Trust review, 12 months after its launch, will assess the effects Canvas has on the partner’s incentives to syndicate their content to other platforms.

∑         The platform must remain accessible without a subscription.

∑         The BBC must return for further approval if costs exceed those projected by more than 20% in any one year.

∑         The BBC must report on whether the proposed accessibility features, such as audio description, have been incorporated. The Trust will review the signposting of content and parental controls.

Users will also be able to access internet services such as Facebook, YouTube and Flickr via their TVs.

See also:

Digital Media – IPTV

Digital Media – Online Video Media

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EU’s smart metering standardisation showing results

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

The increasingly liberalised electricity market in Europe has caused the need for standardisation for smart metering. Although several European standards have been established, the EC has called for a more comprehensive set of open standards covering all utility models. As such, in early 2009 it began funding the OPEN Meter Project, a collaborative research project to develop a set of open and public standards for smart multi-metering services, supporting electricity, gas, water and heat metering. The set of standards will be based on existing industry standards where practicable, including those established for BPL and metering for electricity and other utilities. The project is coordinated by the EC to the European Standardisation Organisations CEN, CENELEC and ETSI.

 

The project is aimed at removing possible barriers to the wider adoption of smart metering in Europe, by ensuring that products and systems based on the new standards are interoperable and supported by most stakeholders including meter manufacturers (for electricity, water, gas and heat), utilities, research institutes standardisation organisations. European utilities include Iberdrola (Spain), Electicité de France (EdF РFrance), Endesa and Enel (Italy), and RWE (Germany).

 

In June 2009 the project reported on a number of regulatory aspects of smart metering (both on a European and national level), and in the following August it reported on suitable BPL and wireless technologies for smart metering (wireless including GPRS, 3G, WiFi and TETRA).

 

The project is expected to run until June 2011.

 

For more information of smart meter developments, see:

We invite your comments: Comments Off on EU’s smart metering standardisation showing results

New Zealand’s Ultra-Fast Broadband Network

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

Broadband uptake in New Zealand continued by 14% in 2009 which was above the OECD average, a trend that is likely to continue through to 2010/11, by which time fibre-based services will be more widely available. Information on the key broadband providers as well as broadband statistics and forecasts to 2010 is detailed in the publication.

While DSL continues to be New Zealand’s most common broadband connection type (77%), there is a notable trend toward mobile broadband connections. Over the 15-month period from March 2008 to June 2009, the number of subscribers with cellular, cable or satellite connections climbed by 53% to reach 220,000.

 

Broadband subscribers – annual change by technology – 2005 – 2010

Year

DSL

Other1

Mobile

Fibre

Total

Annual change

2005

169%

64%

n/a

159%

2006

60%

56%

n/a

60%

2007

34%

14%

n/a

33%

2008

24%

38%

16%

0%

26%

2009

15%

36%

1%

100%

18%

2010 (e)

12%

10%

1%

10%

26%

(Source: BuddeComm based on company data)

Notes: 1 Datacards, cable, and satellite subscribers.

 

The next step in broadband is however revolutionary. The New Zealand Government has given further details on the policies it announced earlier in 2009 regarding its $1.5 billion investment in a national ultra-fast broadband network. The plan has received widespread support. Based on a wholesale-only open network the new infrastructure will set the country up for the new direction that is being taken in telecommunications – from a telephone, and in recent times an Internet network, to essential infrastructure for a range of other economic and social sectors including the development of e-government, e-commerce and digital media.

The government has also committed to partnering with the private sector to accelerate the rollout of close to $3.5 billion for an ultra-fast broadband service to 75% of New Zealanders within the next ten years. The government’s commitment to New Zealand will create a booming ICT industry based on the services being able to be developed and delivered using the Ultra-Fast Broadband Network.

In this new BuddeComm publication we draw attention to the importance of looking across sectors to create synergy. The New Zealand Government is expected to further enhance its trans-sector policies for the UFB during 2010. We discuss a new approach, which applies across infrastructure projects, and look at the potential synergies between the building of roads, sewerage systems, water and gas pipe networks, as well as telecoms and electricity networks.

The UFB will stimulate the digital economy and digital media companies are playing an increasingly important role in the telecommunications markets. An overview on the digital economy and digital media markets in 2009, including updates and information on the e-health and e-learning markets. A snapshot of the current status of the smart grid market, smart homes and smart meter debate is provided with information on renewable energy products and where the market may trend in 2010. Information on the latest offerings in the mobile TV market is highlighted. 

 

BuddeComm’s annual publication, New Zealand – Ultra-Fast Broadband provides a detailed overview and analysis of the emerging Ultra-Fast Broadband Network. Statistics and further analysis on the Internet, broadband, Digital Economy, Digital Media and wireless broadband sectors of the New Zealand telecommunications markets are also detailed.  For more information see: New Zealand – Ultra-Fast Broadband

We invite your comments: Comments Off on New Zealand’s Ultra-Fast Broadband Network

Fibre Deployment Bill

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2009

In December 2009 the Government introduced the draft Telecommunications Legislation Amendment (Fibre Deployment) Bill that will amend the Telecommunications Act 1997. It will enable the Minister to make instruments specifying classes of new developments such that where a fixed line is installed it needs to be optical fibre.

This Bill will assist implementing the Government’s policy that fibre-to-the-premises infrastructure should be installed in new developments that receive planning approval from 1st July 2010.

The effect of the new legislation will be that it will require fixed telecommunications lines to be installed within a specified new development or class of new developments to be optical fibre lines and to meet any other specified conditions.

The provisions will apply whether the real estate development project is intended to establish building lots, or building units, or both, for either sale or lease.  The legislation will not apply to lines that are not intended to provide a carriage service to the public (e.g. private networks) or not for use with customer equipment at an end-user’s premises.

By enabling the Minister to specify a development or classes of developments in which optical fibre lines will need to be installed, the legislation enables the Minister to implement the Government’s policy on a targeted basis that can take account of changes in this market over time and regional or local circumstances.

While not addressed in the Bill, it is envisaged that this legislation will be complemented by changes to state, territory and local planning arrangements, which would further support the roll-out of fibre-to-the-premises, and where necessary, the installation of fibre-ready facilities, such as appropriate ducting.

Part 20A is intended to apply to all types of new developments, including greenfield (broadacre) estates, urban infill and urban renewal projects.

The Bill also enables the Minister to specify in a legislative instrument that where optical fibre lines are generally required, non-fibre (e.g. copper) fixed infrastructure may be permitted (for example, where customers have equipment that requires the use of a non-fibre line). 

The Bill also amends Part 6 of the Telecommunications Act to more readily enable the development of industry codes and standards relating to fibre optic lines and related facilities. In addition to providing necessary guidance on relevant technical matters, this measure responds to calls from stakeholders for such guidance to promote nationally consistent network and service outcomes.

 

Australia – National Broadband Network – Overview & Analysis

Australia – National Broadband Network – Critical Considerations

Australia – National Broadband Network – Competition and Regulations

Australia – National Broadband Network – Design and Deployment Strategies

Australia – National Broadband Network – Early Projects

Australia – National Broadband Network – Industry at crossroads

Australia – National Broadband Network – NBN Co and Infrastructure

Australia – National Broadband Network – Overview & Analysis

Australia – National Broadband Network – Telstra

Australia – National Broadband Network based on Trans-sector model

Australia – National Broadband Network Trans-sector projects

Australia – National Broadband Network – Government’s Trans-Sector Conference

 

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